In Mauretania the global programme on sustainable fisheries and aquaculture focuses on sustainable fisheries management.
Photo: GIZ

The SEWOH Global Programme for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture

The Global Programme for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture is part of the German government’s special initiative ‘One World – No Hunger’ (SEWOH). The programme supports local people in African countries in getting better supplies of and access to high-quality fisheries products.

Fish products are a vital source of high quality protein, micronutrients and vitamins. Thus, they are an instrument in combating hunger and malnutrition. Employment in the fisheries and aquaculture sector guarantees the livelihood of millions of families especially in developing countries. Today however, the aquatic resources are under increasing pressure, with many fish stocks already being overexploited. Sustainable management of artisanal fisheries and aquaculture and fighting illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU fishing) is crucial to secure these resources for future generations.

The special initiative ‘One World – No Hunger’ (SEWOH) of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) has set itself the goal of reducing extreme poverty and hunger. The SEWOH Global Programme on sustainable fisheries and aquaculture supports these objectives by improving supplies of and access to high-quality fisheries products for the local population. It also makes an important contribution to improving local income-generating opportunities, and hence to securing the livelihoods of the local population. The programme pays special attention to vulnerable and marginalised population groups.

On behalf of the BMZ, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) implements the global programme on sustainable fisheries and aquaculture in four African countries. Activities in Uganda and Mauretania focus on sustainable fisheries management, while interventions in Madagascar and Malawi address sustainable aquaculture. The programme aims to increase fish and income from sustainable and resource-protecting artisanal fishery and aquaculture for the food-insecure population and to reduce fish from IUU fishing.

Focus on sustainable use of the resources: water and land

Activities are adapted to the special needs in the different countries. Concerning aquaculture, small farmers are e.g. advised on how to implement improved management practices. They learn how to use water, land and feed inputs in a sustainable manner and how to increase productivity at the same time. These measures also contribute to the protection of resources in rural areas.

In the field of fisheries, the programme works closely together with fisheries authorities and the national governments to improve the framework conditions, introduce boat registration and control mechanisms, and create consulting capacities in the respective countries. Awareness campaigns on the nutritional value of fish products will complement these activities.

Friederike Sorg and Corinna Dax
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, Bonn/Germany