Germany’s Minister of Agriculture Christian Schmidt (2nd from left) handing over the Final Communiqué to UN-Habitat Executive Director Joan Clos (left), China’s Permanent Representative to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Niu Dun (right) and Japan’s Vice-Minister of Agriculture Hiromichi Matsushima (2nd from right).
Germany’s Minister of Agriculture Christian Schmidt (2nd from left) handing over the Final Communiqué to UN-Habitat Executive Director Joan Clos (left), China’s Permanent Representative to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Niu Dun (right) and Japan’s Vice-Minister of Agriculture Hiromichi Matsushima (2nd from right).
Photo: BMEL/ Michael Gottschalk
<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Next > Last >>
At the Agriculture Ministers’ Summit in Berlin, Germany, in mid-January 2016, ministers from 65 countries adopted a communiqué on food security in times of urbanisation.

According to United Nations forecasts, three quarters of the world population will be living in cities and conurbations by 2050. At this year’s Global Forum for Food and Agriculture (GFFA), which was held in Berlin /Germany in mid-January, ministers of agriculture from 65 countries met to develop strategies to ensure food for the growing urban population.

At the end of the International Agricultural Ministers’ Summit, they demanded that urban food security be made a global priority. In their opinion, the national and international debate on urbanisation is not paying sufficient attention to food security. However, they argue, this is a prerequisite for political and social stability and crucial for planning and managing the urbanisation process successfully.

In order to achieve this, the ministers made a number of promises in their Final Communiqué. They seek to join forces to create the necessary framework conditions to master three crucial challenges on the way to global food security:

- a productive and sustainable agriculture that simultaneously meets the growing demand for food while maintaining biodiversity and making efficient use of the natural resources, which are becoming scarcer;

- efficient and reliable supply and value chains in order to connect urban demand with rural supply and to minimise food losses and waste;

- vibrant rural areas as attractive places to live and work in that contribute to minimising rural depopulation and migratory pressure of cities.

Productive and sustainable agriculture

In order to achieve these goals, they want to see to it that farmers – in particular smallholders – have adequate access to capital and financial services, education, training, inputs, technology, services, extension services and market information.

<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Next > Last >>