The panel discussion on Drought Resilience took place at DIE in Bonn.
Photo: © GIZ / Sebastian Kuhn

20.06.2017

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Social protection instruments have gained popularity among policy responses to drought. At a panel discussion organised by the German Development Institute (DIE) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), experiences from Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi were presented that show that regular income transfers allow people to better meet their immediate basic consumption needs and enable them to save in anticipation of future shocks.

“Social Protection – A main Pillar in Drought Resilience?” was the topic of a panel discussion organised by German Development Institute (GDI/DIE) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) on behalf of the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)in Bonn/Germany on May 31st. It was part of an event series on drought resilience titled “Research meets Development: Drought resilience in Sub-Saharan Africa”.

Social protection instruments have gained popularity among policy responses to drought during the last decade. An increasing number of governments in Sub-Saharan Africa have integrated cash transfers and public works schemes into their strategies for food and nutrition security and disaster risk management. Expectations are high. Social protection is to reach affected populations early, prevent depletion of assets and famine, but also improve post-drought recovery, adaptation and resilience. Against this background, researchers from the English Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and the International Food Policy Institute (IFPRI) as well as practitioners from GIZ and Germany’s KfW Entwicklungsbank discussed their experiences and the evidence available from Ethiopia, Kenya and Malawi.

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