The Anopheles mosquito has developed resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. <br/>Photo: © James Cathany/public domain image
The Anopheles mosquito has developed resistance to pyrethroid insecticides.
Photo: © James Cathany/public domain image

24.03.2016

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Pyrethroid insecticides used to kill both farm pests and malaria-carrying mosquitoes. However, in recent years, a dramatic increase in resistance of malaria vectors in most African countries has been observed. Scientists are asking for urgent action to maintain malaria control.

Malaria control relies on insecticides to control the mosquito vector. As efforts to check the disease have intensified, selection pressure on mosquitoes to develop resistance to these insecticides has grown. The distribution and strength of this resistance has increased dramatically in recent years and now threatens the success of control programmes.
 
A recent study by scientists from the Department of Vector Biology of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in Liverpool/United Kingdom provides an update on the current status of resistance to the major insecticide classes in African malaria vectors, considers the evidence that this resistance is already compromising malaria control efforts, and looks to the future to highlight some of the new insecticide-based tools under development and the challenges in ensuring that they are most effectively deployed to manage resistance.
 
The paper, which aggregated data on the issue from other studies, found a clear link between the use of pyrethroids as an agricultural pesticide in Africa and the resistance of Anopheles mosquitoes to this insecticide.

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