Newly created employment opportunities for women in export companies lead to a higher share of income controlled by women.
Photos: Jörg Böthling

21.03.2017

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Many countries that have become important suppliers of horticulture produce to the world market – such as Kenya, Ethiopia, Peru and India – have high rates of poverty and food insecurity within their borders, and especially so in rural areas. So does this also mean that the exports have a negative impact on the population’s food situation? Our authors have taken a look at how these aspects relate to one another.

In the past two decades, exports of horticultural products (including fruits, vegetables and cut-flowers) from developing countries have increased sharply – as can be seen in the figure below. Exports from Latin America more than tripled in the past 20 years, and those from Africa and Asia more than quadrupled. Horticultural products have even become the most important agri-food export category for developing countries, with export earnings having surpassed those from traditional tropical commodities, such as tea, cocoa and coffee.

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