21.09.2016

<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Next > Last >>
Indigenous Peoples and local communities hold a large share of the world’s land area under customary systems. However, there is a tremendous gap between what is held by communities in practice and what is formally recognised by governments.

When Indigenous Peoples and local communities lack formal, legal recognition of their land rights, they are vulnerable to dispossession and loss of their identities, livelihoods, and cultures. The environmental health of the land they manage is endangered, and the insecurity of communities’ rights fans disputes over land and natural resources that can contribute to armed conflict. By contrast, countries whose governments formally recognise customary land rights are making progress towards realising human rights imperatives established in international frameworks such as International Labour Organization Convention No. 169, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), and the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests (VGGT).

Indigenous peoples and local communities – at least 1.5 billion people – are estimated to hold at least 50 per cent of the world’s land area through customary, community-based tenure systems. However, they only hold formally recognised ownership over ten per cent of the land, as the latest study by the Rights and Resources Initiative, “Who Owns the World’s Land?

<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Next > Last >>