Livestock exports in the Horn are booming among pastoralists. Supporting policies that capitalise on innovations and local knowledge are vital for economic growth, livelihoods and poverty reduction.
Photo: Abdurehman Eid/Future Agricultures Consortium
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The Future Agricultures Consortium was established in 2005 with support from the UK Department for International Development (DFID) as a learning alliance of leading African and UK-based research organisations. The Consortium provides independent analysis and advice for improving agricultural policy-making. The aim is to encourage critical debate and policy dialogue on the future of agriculture in Africa, elaborating the practical and policy challenges of establishing and sustaining pro-poor agricultural growth.

Agriculture remains a crucial pathway out of poverty in Africa: absorbing labour, producing food and generating economic growth, both within and perhaps most importantly beyond the sector. While there are various on-going efforts focused on promoting agriculture to increase food security and generate growth in the wider economy, a huge gap prevails in understanding the political incentives that underlie agricultural policy-making in Africa.

Since 2005, the Future Agricultures Consortium has aimed to fill this gap by looking at politics and policy processes shaping agricultural research and development in Africa: examining how and why decisions are made, the conditions for change, and the practical and policy challenges of establishing and sustaining agricultural growth that benefits poor producers, pastoralists and consumers.

With original research, analysis and debate, Future Agricultures aims to provide critical insights and dialogue on African agricultural policy agendas, through a network of over 90 researchers in 15 countries in Africa, as well as in the UK.

Agriculture: more than just  a technical challenge

Too often it is assumed that the key to policy change is better evidence and enhanced technical design, yet many of the best designed policies falter when implemented.

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