Mungbean sprouts are very good sources of ascorbic acid, reaching levels above 50 mg ascorbic acid/100 g fresh weight. Due to increased activities of hydrolytic enzymes during sprouting, there is a loss in total dry matter, starch, and antinutrients such as phytic acid and polyphenols and an increase in essential amino acids, sucrose and reducing sugars, and vitamins. Sprout digestibility is improved due to the partial hydrolysis of storage proteins and starch during sprouting.
Photo: A. Ebert

09.12.2013

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Recent studies have shown that modern breeding for high yield, visual appearance and long shelf life led to an unintentional decline in taste and the content of essential nutrients in vegetables. AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center is studying whether traditional vegetables are more nutritious than modern varieties and whether early growth stages of these vegetables offer consumers a higher content of phytonutrients.

Diet-related diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, stroke, and cancer are escalating in developed and developing countries due to imbalanced food consumption patterns and have become a major burden for the public health sector. Health experts are convinced of the multiple benefits of consuming vegetables and fruits and the urgency to take preventive action to control diet-related diseases. The World Health Organization recommends that consumers eat at least 400 grams of fruit and vegetables a day, while the World Cancer Research Fund would like to see this threshold level raised to 600 grams per day. As fruit and vegetables, especially traditional vegetables, are rich sources of vitamins, micronutrients and antioxidants, encouraging frequent consumption of these crops is a good strategy to combat micronutrient deficiency. But are modern vegetable varieties really nutrient-dense?

Recent studies have shown that breeding for high yield, visual appearance and long shelf life may lead to an unintentional decline in taste and the content of some essential nutrients.

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