Photos: Institute of Agricultural Engineering/University of Hohenheim

21.03.2017

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Insufficient cooling systems are among the chief constraints many small-scale dairy farmers in the Global South are faced with. Quite frequently, milk is rejected by collecting centres or processing plants. Germany’s University of Hohenheim is testing the efficacy of an environmentally friendly cooling system in Tunisia and Kenya.

In many African countries, milk is produced mostly by small and medium-sized dairy farms. These groups are mostly constrained by a lack of cooling systems and inadequate or reduced hygiene standards, which often leads to high microbial contamination of the milk. Under warm climatic conditions, raw milk can exceed the maximum bacterial count prescribed by food safety laws after only two to five hours. During the hottest periods of the year, a lack of quality can lead to high rates of rejected milk at collection centres or dairy processing plants. Milk cooling is essential to inhibit bacterial growth and stabilise milk until processing.

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