The majority of workers depending on commercial capture fisheries value chains operate in the small-scale fisheries sector.
Photo: N. Franz

17.08.2015

<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Next > Last >>

With its Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF Guidelines), FAO has created a tool that is to help small-scale fisheries stakeholders empower themselves. Our authors describe its strengths and weaknesses and how it is being put into practice.

Sea-cucumber collectors in the Solomon Islands, women smoking fish in Côte d’Ivoire, gillnetters from Corsica harvesting finfish, rock lobster fishers in Chile, members of the Community Fisheries organisations operating in the Cambodian Tonlé Sap – they all belong to what we call small-scale fisheries. The diversity of small-scale fisheries in various countries does not allow for a global definition of the sector, but there are many commonalities among these people, be it from marine waters or inland waters, in developing countries or in developed countries.
The often informal nature of operations, the frequently remote and scattered location of small-scale fishing communities as well as a prevalence of social, economic and political marginalisation of its actors have resulted in a lack of attention to small-scale fisheries at all levels. As it is estimated that over 90 per cent of the about 120 million full-time and part-time workers directly depending on commercial capture fisheries value chains operate in the small-scale fisheries sector, it means we are inadvertently neglecting an enormous portion of our fisheries stakeholders.

This is changing.

<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Next > Last >>