A group of producers of groundnut appreciate a variety at the ICRISAT research station in Mali during a women farmers field day visit..
Photo: ICRISAT

16.10.2013

<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Next > Last >>

“Empowering rural women is crucial for ending hunger and poverty,” said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon on the occasion of the International Day of Rural Women, held annually by the international community on the 15th October. What this can look like in practice is demonstrated by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-arid Tropics (ICRISAT) with the example of the groundnut value chain in West Africa.

Groundnut remains the major source of livelihoods for small-scale farmers in Mali, Niger and Nigeria. Recent surveys reveal that groundnut is planted on about 36 per cent of total cultivated area in Mali, 15 per cent in Niger and 34 per cent in Nigeria. Groundnut contributes to 64 per cent of household cash revenue in Mali, 66 per cent in Niger and 54 per cent in Nigeria.

Groundnut is a woman’s crop in countries in West Africa. In Mali, 85 per cent of private/individual plots belong to women, and in Niger 35 per cent. In Nigeria, there is little participation of women in groundnut production activities, but they are strongly involved in local groundnut processing activities.

Niger: A cluster-based approach to enhance the groundnut value chain in the Dosso Region

During the last ten years, the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-arid Tropics (ICRISAT) and partners have successfully built up women community-based groundnut seed systems in the Dosso region, in Niger.

<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Next > Last >>